Shannon Lush gets it wrong #5

Yesterday on 6PR Shannon Lush once again gave us her cleaning advice as part of her regular show. As before, however, a substantial amount of that advice was wrong.

  1. The presenter, Simon Beaumont said that he had overspray from bore water on his car and it had left white marks.  Shannon told him that these marks had damaged his paint and he was to use “sweet almond oil” to attempt to cover it up. This advice is completely incorrect.  The white marks are simply dried mineral deposits from the water and are easily removed with any acidic kitchen or bathroom cleaner.  Ajax Spray and Wipe (lactic acid), Shower Power (citric acid) and a host of other cleaners will easily remove these marks.  Alternatively, they can simply be polished off with Brasso. Paints on modern cars our extremely advanced two pack formulations and are very chemically resistant.  The days of overflowing petrol leaving marks on your paint (acrylic) are long gone, and there is no commonly available chemical or product that you have lying around the house that you cannot use on your car with complete safety.
  2. A listener asked how to get residue off his bathroom floor that had been left by a rubber mat.  Shannon’s advice was to put salt on it and then brush it away.  I suppose an abrasive like this may work eventually, but a far quicker approach is to use acetone
  3. A couple of callers had questions about glass.  The first question was how to get paint overspray off glass.  Shannon’s advice was to essentially use a paint scraper as you shouldn’t use any chemicals that may damage glass.  This was followed up by a question about glass that had been damaged by soap scum. For a start, glass is extremely chemically resiliant, and there is no chemical you might want to try to get paint off with that will damage it. I have explained the chemistry of glass (shower screens) elsewhere but with the paint on the glass I’d try acetone first. Failing that, use a heat gun – the paint will blister up and peel away. But don’t blast the window with the heat gun on it’s highest setting immediately or you might crack it. Warm it up slowly.
  4. The last one falls into the “has anyone ever actually done this?” category – a used tea bag in a panty hose to get retic overspray off an anodised window frame?? Please tell me if you have actually done this. For a start, contrary to the advice that was given, anodised window frames will not be damaged by irrigation water. That’s the whole point of the anodising – it’s an extremely stable proprietary coating that is resistant to anything it encounters in and around the home. The irrigation (mineral) marks will be easily removed by any acidic kitchen or bathroom cleaner (Easy Off BAM is perhaps the product of choice with its sulphamic acid)

Once again, please bear in mind that Shannon Lush is not a chemist. She has no formal training in chemistry whatsoever.

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